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TAIWAN FUN MAGAZINE, July, 2005.

Oma Ursels German Restaurant

 


9, Lane 6, YongKang Street, Taipei
(02) 2392-2447
Hours: 11:30 am-10 pm

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By Tracy Perkins Translated by Chou NaiXien

When you walk into Oma Ursels, you feel immediately at home. Maybe it's the huge baskets of fragrant homemade bread at the door, or maybe it's the homely country decor, but this is the kind of place where the hours just slip by.

Owner Qiu Daiyu travels to Germany every year to study some aspect of German cuisine, from sausage-making to patisserie or the use of herbs in a food culture that is not nearly as static as most people believe. She says that, in recent years, young people in Germany have become very fond of Greek cooking, so she was inspired to create a Greek Herb Sausage which is served with Tzaziki as part of the Sausage Plate (NT$400). It is also possible to order the Sausage Plate as part of the set menu which includes soup, bread, salad, main dish, coffee or tea and a slice of cake (NT$480).

All the sausages are made on the premises, but recipes have been changed to accommodate local tastes and conditions. Weisswurst or White Sausage, traditionally made with veal, is made with pork. Not only is veal prohibitively expensive and hard to come by, but local people are not comfortable with the idea of eating it. All sausages can be bought frozen to take home.
Oma Ursels also sells more than 100 different cakes, some available daily, and others, like Stollen, at special times of the year to correspond with German festivals. The Tea-time Special, with any non-alcoholic beverage and two pieces of cake (NT$199), is great value for anyone with a hankering for a little sweetness. I sampled the Baumkuchen or Tree Cake, 16 layers of light, short pastry, flavoured with lemon zest and coated with marzipan and chocolate. I was delighted to learn that this is a traditional cake from Dresden, the city of my great-grandparents, and that it is often used as a wedding cake, too.
Oma Ursels also has a party service with delivery and is a favourite amongst German expats.

 

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