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HOME > NORTH TAIWAN > TAIPEI > ARTS & LEISURE >

Taiwan Fun Magazine, September 2002

Culture Bites :

By Selena Huang Translated by Melanie Hou

CAN CAN DE PARIS

When: September 19th & 20th at 7:30 pm;
September 22nd at 2:30 pm & 7:30 pm
Where: Sun-Yat Sen Memorial Hall
Tel: (02) 2341-9898

       The Can Can de Paris, and their provocative Can Can revue, brings all the glamour and gusto of Parisian nightlife to Taiwan. The group, which has been performing together for over twenty years, thrills the audience with spirited music, colorful costumes and dazzling choreography reminiscent of fun-loving French cabarets. You'll shout, "Encore" for more! Jazz, tap and hip-hop are also on the agenda.

Lian Hwa Pu Mun Chinese Opera "The Legend of Three Kingdoms, Part I"

When: September 3rd-5th at 7:30 pm
Where: New Stage Hall
Tel: (02) 2722-4302 ect.7555
AUTHOR/TRANSLATOR

       "The Legend of Three Kingdoms, Part I" is this year's feature production of the Lian Hwa Pu Mun Chinese Opera Troupe. It's a classic tale, one of epic proportions centered on ancient heroes, turbulent times and the romance of the most westerly reaches of the early Chinese empire. The story is among the most popular and has influenced generations of actors, artists and writers. The Lian Hwa Pu Mun re-enactment includes dramatic performance, powerful music and pageantry typical of traditional Chinese theater. Stage scenes recreate the harsh dessert regions of the hinterlands.

Folk Art Exhibit of Taiwanese Ceramics

When: until September 15th
Where: Yinge Ceramics Museum
Tel: (02) 8677-2727

       This exhibit presents legendary Taiwanese characters modeled in clay and includes two distinct ceramic styles: "Jiau Zi" and "Yinge." "Jiau Zi," known as "Mon-on-a" in the early days of the Republic (in Taiwanese "On-a" translates as "doll"), were made as ornamentation for temple roof tops. Gods of Health, Wealth and Longevity are among the most commonly portrayed. Pieces representing "Yinge" tend to be more utilitarian - ranging from vases to tea implements - or purely decorative. Yinge was the genesis site of Taiwan's pottery production, and continues to inspire today's contemporary ceramic artists.

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